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Follow her as she prepares and partakes the "bread for the stomach" in http://beforesixdiet.blogspot.com/ . And while you are full at it, she offers you the "bread for the soul" in her travels by foot and by thoughts in http://footandfire.blogspot.com/ Happy Reading!

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Sipalay City: 12 Photos taken at the Campomanes Bay Area


I believe that every last-minute booking is always made here at the Campomanes Bay area. That is because the White Beach area located at Punta Ballo, Barangay 4, Sipalay City is always fully booked given that they the resorts there are with their own websites. Also, this is a little farther from the city proper. But since all good things resulted from our last-minute decision to go, I consider our stay at the underrated Campomanes Bay area a blessing in disguise. We don't need noise or Red Horse to while the night anyway... While the Eco-port is the first unsightly view that welcomes you, the island from left to right can never bore you. On the right is the stairs leading cave where the spring water of the community comes from and the marine sanctuary below is located. One can watch the sunrise and sunset with the sound of the cicadas as background. Isn't that amazing?

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Floating house for the Bantay Dagat and Visitors as well.

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The woman doing her laundry using the rush of waters 
from the spring coming from the cave.

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The view of the beach on the other island facing Brgy. Campomanes. 
In between them is the Campomanes Bay.

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A rainbow in front of us!

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Sunset in front of me.

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Sunset on my Left.

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This is the eco-port.

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This is the side where we are staying.

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Tamarind tree which grew amazingly old.

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Tranquility defined from my Left side...

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Best view on my right. 
One of the marine sanctuaries is not far from here.

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Never miss the sunset at the Old Spanish house and the Lighthouse at the end of Gigantes Norte, Isla Gigantes, Carles, Iloilo


We ended our day tour at the old Spanish house located at the end of the island of Gigantes Norte. It was a sight during sunset given the ambient light given off by the sun and the rustic paint and structure of the old house. It withstood the test of time because it is made of cement mixed with shells found in the locality and eggs, just like how old Catholic churches were made then.

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I mentioned we enjoyed the ambient light of the sunset.. 
Here are what we took during our brief visit:


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The lighthouse is a recent one and it is said to be Japanese-funded.

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 And Kodjack, our tour-guide and water-fetcher, becomes an instant photographer...
Just check this out:


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Ah, the view....


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And please don't forget to buy trinkets for souvenirs from these lads:



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Don't forget to search for more in the search box... 

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Bakwitan Cave of Gigantes Norte, Isla Gigantes, Carles, Iloilo



Our group had a grand time sampling the trail going up the cave and partly towards the opening. We did not move forward anymore than the first touch base because we were not properly dressed for spelunking as we were dripping wet with saltwater after the day's Island hopping. Nevertheless, we enjoyed the introduction to this Bakwitan Cave, so-called because it is used as evacuation place for families from lowland during the past typhoons and this cave saved many lives. 

Please check out the allure of this cave. There are sporadic live rocks that still have the potential to grow. Also, as in any other caves which are not regulated, there are occasional graffittis on the cave walls... 



Jun "The Cavekeeper," our cave tour guide, is trained regarding caves by the Department of Tourism and he displayed some wisdom regarding taking care of the Bakwitan Cave.

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A makeshift bed used by the cave's temporary resident in the past.

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The Balete or locally called Lunok extends its roots inside the cave from atop!!!

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Check out my other blogs on Isla Gigantes here.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Scallops, Wasay wasay and other Seafood offerings at Isla Gigantes, Carles, Iloilo



Scallops may be a delicacy among cityfolks, it is a daily fare for the folks of Isla Gigantes in carles, Iloilo. We were served scallops each meal ranging from scallops in oyster sauce, scallops in tomato sauce, scallops in chop suey and we just missed the baked scallops topped with cheese and garlic! If it is P600 a kilo in the city, it can almost be free in Gigantes. So, if you are the type who rares for seafoods, Isla Gigantes offers you the freshest catch of the day from crabs, shrimp, fish and squids.
They also serve the rare Wasay-wasay, a mollusk that resembles the oyster but its shell casing is shaped like an axe, hence the local name.


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 Wasay-wasay

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The shell casing is shaped by nature like an axe,
hence, the name Wasay-wasay.

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Scallops with shrimp in tomato sauce.

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Squid.

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Fish

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In the island of Gigantes Norte, they have the so-called Scallops Mountain,
a huge pile of shell casings of the best food fare in the islands: Scallops. 
Scallop shells are everywhere...

By the way, please check out my blog on how the island got its name... Isla Gigantes.

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Boljoon Museum: Archaeological findings housed in "Ang Karaang Bolhoon" gallery

A gold earring. The report also shows that the large bent tube gold earring was found on what was once the right ear of a male burial. A similar example is found in the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Gold Collection taken from Surigao and is dated to the 14th up to the 16th century.


“Boljoon is rich in heritage now because it is the only town that has evidence to show pre-Hispanic times,” remarked University of San Carlos' Jose Eleazar Bersales, head of the excavation project. The excavation report shows that their finds came from the Pre-Spanish (1550-1650) and Early Spanish (1700s-1800s) periods. Bersales further said that it is the first time that an earring was found on a male, that a ceramic bowl has Chinese characters as part of its design, and that it is first evidence throughout Cebu of a pre-Hispanic times.

The Burials 
A total of nine burials in various states of internment were uncovered at a depth of 60-70 cm. This brings to a total of 26 burials from the first excavation phase to this current phase. The excavated area is estimated to total to 42 square meters. Noticeably, the males were buried with their hands clasped across their chests while the females were buried with their hands covering their genital area. The team also found two distinct positions in these burials - one group comprises a North-South direction where the head is on the southern end while another group is composed of an East-West position where the head is oriented to the East. The practice of burying the dead with ceramic wares and weapons was thought to be a Satanic practice in the Spanish era, so, this settlement is clearly non-Christian,” Bersales said.

Unlike other burials found near the shore or beach, no net sinkers or shells were found lining the grave of this site. He explained that this could mean that these people were not fisherfolks, but were probably trading or bartering cotton with Chinese merchants. Bersales said that the ceramic ware came from Anxi in Fujian Province, China and is decorated with blue leaf and Chinese characters. It was covering the face of a male burial and the characters are roughly translated as “A new leaf means a new wish.”

A white ware powder box was also found on the left area of a female burial wearing an orange carnelian bead, a tiny red glass bead and a tiny gold bead. The carnelian and glass bead probably came from India or China as there is no local source for the gemstone or the glass. Also found in the burial were two pieces of coral stone which had holes indicating that these were worn in the hip area or pelvic region, probably as an “anting-anting” or amulet. A light olive-colored bottle or jar was found in the burial believed dated to the end of the Ming Dynasty (1644) or the beginning of the Qing dynasty. A near complete burial of wild pig was also recovered near another burial.

Further, pieces of evidence that were uncovered indicated the Early Spanish period (1700s-1800s) like bronze medallion, square nails, iron lags, a small bronze cross, broken pieces of Chinese ceramics and a Kinamunggay jar.

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Chinese Porcelain. Three ceramic dishes made during the time of Chinese Emperor Wan Li, the Zhangzhou period between 1573 and 1620; two bowls from Anxi kiln in Fujian province in China produced between the 1590s and 1620s; and a  jar of the late Ming Dynasty (1590 and 1620)



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Gold necklace. Also on display is a 14-karat to 18-karat gold necklace, measuring 1.1 meters long and weighing 34.1 grams, which was recovered from the burial site of a native Filipina in Boljoon, and a gold burial face mask found at the Plaza Independencia.


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Bones.

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Japanese Ceramics.

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Japanese Ceramics. Dr. Takenory Nogami, a Japanese researcher from the Arita Museum of History, expressed excitement over the discovery of a large dish and a jarlet “emariware” or Japanese porcelain. “The recovered pieces in Boljoon are unique because it is still intact in the aquare,” Nogami told reporters in the Museo sa Sugbo in 2011.


Sources and further readings:


Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Boljoon Museum in Cebu: Religious Pieces


Beside the Boljoon Church called "Patrocino de Maria Parish" located in the coastal and southern part of Cebu lives a small museum filled with religious pieces from the church. Aside from the old paintings and wooden Christian images, the museum keeps some church records beautifully written in longhand and in Spanish language, among them is Julian Evangelista's parochial notebook dated 1831.

The museum can be accessed virtually here. The Boljoon Studies Center introduces this museum stating, "The Museum displays more than one hundred exhibits, items used by our local ancestors for household, cooking, spinning, weaving, farming, writing, playing and many other aspects of their daily life. The exhibits are completed by numerous information panels.

It is an excellent visual documentation of how our local society gradually changed from using natural (biodegradable) materials taken from the environment to plastic, from music instruments and phonograph to downloads, from handwriting and typewriter to PC and text messages.

It also shows that once great contributors to local livelihood like spinning and weaving cotton and abaca eventually disappeared due to the incremental loss of their markets."



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