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Follow her as she prepares and partakes the "bread for the stomach" in http://beforesixdiet.blogspot.com/ . And while you are full at it, she offers you the "bread for the soul" in her travels by foot and by thoughts in http://footandfire.blogspot.com/ Happy Reading!

Saturday, November 29, 2014

How to Travel in Foot-and-Fire Style

Victory Fly with the Philippine Eagle in the Philippine Eagle Center, Davao City.

1. HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PLACES APPEAL TO ME. I love culturally and historically rich places. I love temples, churches and prayer hills. I love the outdoors and walking. I love the streets and discovering nooks and crannies. I can skip malls and swimming pools as well as boutique spas for all of these ancient glories.

2. DON'T BE LATE. It is better to be early than to be sorry is a good travel policy, especially if it is about the airlines and sticking to the organized tour schedule. Waking up early also has an advantage for photographers and early morning walkers like me.

At the Fruit Stand in Davao City

3. BE ORGANIZED BUT BE READY TO DETOUR. Not that I am a control freak but it pays to be organized. Upon arrival in the airport, secure some local currencies first before hailing a taxi. Or better yet, secure an airport pick up. But if anything goes differently as expected, pursue plan B and be brave.

4. INDULGE IN YOUR PASSION. I love to cook and taste something new. I love spices and teas so I try to taste some and bring home some.

Our pose with the groovy museum tour guide of Museum Dabawenyo.

5. GO IN GROUPS. Many cooks spoil the porridge but it pays to go in group with flexible friends who are ready to welcome common friends. But since, one is in a group, one has to be prepared in case one of the friends get sick or denied by the immigration officer; it can get stressful.

6. BUILD AN ITINERARY AROUND YOUR FAVORITE ACTIVITY.  Cooking/Food/Spices, arts and crafts, and tourist spots are my priorities. These are the basics in my travels.

Behind me is the replica of Waling-waling orchid
and the Durian located just in front of the Davao City Hall.

7. LADIES, MIND YOUR HAIR BUT FORGET THE REST. I can appreciate the beaches more if I swam in it so that I don't care if I forgot to put sunblock or have hard hair afterwards since I have a few days of vacation and days of being-in-the-office. Never say "No" because of sunburns and dry hairs.

8. PACK LIGHTLY. It pays to travel light and bring the essential clothes and toiletries. No need to bring 500ml of your favorite shampoo or lotion if one can use only 50ml all throughout the trip.

I and my sister traveled like the locals during our ascent
to the hilly municipality of Lake Sebu.

9. MOVE ON. It always happens that glitches occur when travelling. Just take a deep breath and move on.





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*Inspired by Wanderlust entry in the November 2014 in-flight magazine of Cebu Pacific called Smile entitled, "How to travel like a King," with Joey Mead-King as the featured traveller.

* Photos are taken during our recent Mindanao tour with route: Samal Island-Davao City-Marbel/Koronadal-Lake Sebu trips.

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Manila is NOT poverty only!


As a support to the Filipino community in Germany, I am again running the topic on this photo that launched many opinions, most of them are resigned to the fact that poverty is a reality in our country. But no matter how few and wide is the voice that clamors for under representation (or misrepresentation), it is still a national concern that Manila is represented by poverty ALONE in an exhibit in a foreign land entitled Mega Cities.

Singly, the photo actually has, admittedly, its strength as a message to the Philippine Government in getting its efforts together in eradicating poverty in the country. However, let it be remembered that this photo is exhibited together with other photos under the title MEGA CITIES, and the exhibit is not about poverty or about poor governance. The exhibit is about culture and progress as shown in other photos included in the exhibit. All photos are here. Any professional curator will reconsider balance in deciding what to include, and sadly, Manila was not given justice in this lone representative photo.

To quote a Taiwanese Facebook Friend Karl Jone, he said that "regardless whether rich or poor, every city is unique and Manila is unique and deserves more compliment." This comment from him sums up in the most simple term why we are clamoring or we should be clamoring about this lone photo. Because as megacity, Manila can also be more than poverty ONLY just like Mumbai and Sao Paolo in their double photos in the exhibit. The art curators of this exhibit indeed overlooked balance for Manila here, wittingly or unwittingly.

Here are two related stories I posted. Please see for more criticism on the photo chosen to represent Manila. http://footandfire.blogspot.com/2014/11/is-including-defecating-person-in-photo.html and http://footandfire.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-obscene-detail-nobody-wants.html.

Here is the latest correspondence between the exhibit author Turmforum and the Stuttgart-Ulm Rail Project Society (Originally in German; Translation done by Peter Billard and provided by Naomi Billard).

Dear Ms. Billard,

Thank you for your communication through the Turmforum contact form of 30 October 2014, which I would like to answer as follows.

The aim of the MegaCities exhibition now on display along the passage to the platforms at Stuttgart Main Station is to show the diversity of these cities. Information on this is provided by the introductory text at the start of the series.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

This Photo vs. other Mega-cities: Only poverty represents Manila



         If we are to adjudge what Manila is from the lone photo in a photo exhibit entitled, "Mega-Cities" mounted by Turmforum and the Stuttgart-Ulm Rail Project Society at the Stuttgart rail station in Germany, poverty is the only representative of Manila.

       The lone photo above that represents Manila was taken by German photographer Stephan Schubert and is supposed to embody Manila as a "Metropolis" or one of the big "Cities of the World."

            Most Filipinos in the Philippines won't mind clamoring about this photo being singled out as the best representative of Manila because it is more of a reality check. However, when one is in a foreign soil, one needs to clarify things. This is what Naomi Billard did in our behalf. 

        In an earlier related story, Naomi's grounds in asking for the removal of the poster are: One, it is the invasion of the privacy of the person doing his thing at the edge of the concrete pavement (lower left of the photo), an artistic decision that is tantamount to robbing this toilet-less poorest of the poor his DIGNITY. And two, the photograph misrepresent our country because some other countries' photos come in at least two and "depict skyscrapers soaring towards the heavens, masses of people on overfilled streets – mega-cities teeming with life."

           Most big cities come in two representative photos while Manila is represented by the lone photo above. Here, this writer shall post the rest of the photos for you to judge by yourself why this underrepresentation (or misrepresentation) of Manila should be everyone's concern. Photos Courtesy of Peter Billard.

Kalkutta

Kalkutta



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 Kinshasa


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London (2 posters)


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Paris

Paris


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Cairo

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New York

New York

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Sao Paulo

Sao Paolo

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Istanbul


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Guangzhou

Guangzhou

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Mexico

Mexico


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Dhaka

Dhaka


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Mumbai

Mumbai

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Seoul

Seoul


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Moscow

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Shanghai






Monday, November 10, 2014

The Pacific War Memorial at the Corregidor Island (Part Three)


      Pacific War Memorial was erected to honor of the Filipino and American servicemen who participated in the Pacific War. Financed with an appropriation by the United States Congress, it was completed in 1968. The major memorial structure is a rotunda in which a circular altar falls directly under the dome's open center through which light falls on the altar during daylight hours. The altar symbolizes a wreath of victory with the following words inscribed on its rim: "Sleep, my sons, your duty done, for Freedom's light has come; sleep in the silent depths of the sea, or in your bed of hallowed sod, until you hear at dawn the low, clear reveille of God." The memorial also houses a museum which serves as the repository of relics and memorabilia related to the history of Corregidor. (Taken from a comprehensive Corregidor website called corregidorisland.com.) Please check my earlier post here.



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These are the war history in tablets at the War Memorial park. 
"The record of the land, sea, and air battles is perpetuated in history by the names they bear. xxx" 

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Philippine Liberation (October 17, 1944 to July 4, 1945)
Guerilla Operations
Leyte
Battle for Leyte Gulf
Ormok
Mindanao
Luzon
Corregidor Island
Southern Philippines
Battle of Manila

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The New Guinea to the Philippines
April 22, 1944 to November 27, 1944

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North Pacific
Aleutians
June 3, 1942 to August 24, 1943

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Southwest Pacific
Coral sea and Papua
May 7, 1942 to March 3, 1943

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Defense of Hawaii
December 7, 1941 to June 6, 1942

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Defense of the Philippines
December 8, 1941 to May 6, 1942

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Marianas Campaign
June 11, 1944 to August 10, 1944

Central Pacific
Gilbert and Marshall Islands
November 13, 1943 to February 22, 1944
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The Final Battles
February 16, 1945 to June 21, 1945

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The Philippine Resistance Movement

      In the wake of initial reverses and the retrograde movement to Bataan elemants of USAFFE cut off from the main body continued to defy the enemy elsewhere. Civilians and numerous government officials fired by the same indomitable spirit had organized to establish quasi Military organizations to sustain the fight for freedom. Loosely knit at the outset these organizations grew in force and effectiveness, developing in time into a nationwide resistance movement.
      Throughout the country, guerilla organizations counting among them intrepid men and women of all ages and creeds struck repeated blows against the armies of the invader in a heroic fight contributed greatly to the final liberation of the Philippines. 

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Saturday, November 8, 2014

Sun Cruise's Corregidor Island Tour (Part Two)


      As the tour progressed from the dock (Please see prior post), we were heading to the central area of the Island. After the guide pointed to us the sports area, the water reservoir, cinema, swimming pool, the battery, and so much more, we were led to a more-than-a-kilometer long barracks and we headed to the Spanish Lighthouse just before lunch. 

     After lunch, we headed to the Pacific War Memorial with the Museum  and the Eternal Flame of Freedom, an admirable red orange-painted large steel sculpture which symbolizes the Flame of Freedom burning eternally. Located at the back of the Pacific War Memorial dome, its raised platform provides visitors a breathtaking panoramic view of Manila Bay, the Bataan Peninsula, and the coastline of Cavite. Designed by Aristides Demetrios, the sculpture commemorates the sacrifices, hopes and aspirations, and the heroic struggle by the United States and the Philippines to preserve freedom for future generations. The sculpture stands as a reminder that all men will fight as one if need to be to defend a nation's liberty. Please see a comprehensive and commendable website on Corregidor here.




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The hair-raising "Eternal Flame of Freedom."

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The War Memorial's dome.

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The framed war-survivor US Flag, with lesser stars of course.

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The first family of Pres. Manuel L. Quezon


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